Not all world leaders use Twitter in response to the COVID-19 pandemic: impact of the way of Angela Merkel on psychological distress, behaviour and risk perception

Abstract:

At a time of growing governmental restrictions and ‘physical distancing’ in order to decelerate the spread of COVID-19, psychological
challenges are increasing. Social media plays an important role in maintaining social contact as well as exerting political inuence. World
leaders use it not only to keep citizens informed but also to boost morale and manage people’s fears. However, some leaders do not follow this
approach; an example is the German Chancellor. In a large online survey, we aimed to determine levels of COVID-19 fear, generalized anxiety,
depression, safety behaviour, trust in government and risk perception in Germany. A total of 12 244 respondents participated during the
period of restraint and the public shutdown in March 2020. Concurrent with the German Chancellor’s speech, a reduction of anxiety and
depression was noticeable in the German population. It appears that, in addition to using social media platforms like Twitter, different—and
sometimes more conservative—channels for providing information can also be effective.

SEEK ID: https://seek.studyhub.nfdi4health.de/publications/5

DOI: 10.1093/pubmed/fdaa060

Projects: COVID-19 related studies and tools in Germany

Publication type: Journal

Journal: Journal of Public Health

Citation: Journal of Public Health 42(3):644-646

Date Published: 1st Sep 2020

Registered Mode: by DOI

Authors: Martin Teufel, Adam Schweda, Nora Dörrie, Venja Musche, Madeleine Hetkamp, Benjamin Weismüller, Henrike Lenzen, Mark Stettner, Hannah Kohler, Alexander Bäuerle, Eva-Maria Skoda

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Teufel, M., Schweda, A., Dörrie, N., Musche, V., Hetkamp, M., Weismüller, B., … Skoda, E.-M. (2020). Not all world leaders use Twitter in response to the COVID-19 pandemic: impact of the way of Angela Merkel on psychological distress, behaviour and risk perception. Journal of Public Health, 42(3), 644–646. http://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdaa060
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Created: 2nd Mar 2021 at 09:12

Last updated: 2nd Mar 2021 at 09:13

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